Addendum




Ireland

(11 MEPs displayed)

Copyright in the Digital Single Market
Committee on Legal Affairs
A8-0245/2018:


Lynn
BOYLAN
 (absent) (+) . – I voted against the provisional agreement to this file and in favour of an amendment calling for amendments to be allowed to be tabled. The JURI Committee, who has lead this file, had its mandate on this file completely overturned in July last year at the first full vote of MEPs. Despite this, the final text returned to MEPs this time has reverted back with pretty much the same issues.
In order to ensure fair remuneration of artists Sinn Féin favours a licencing system, which should oblige large platforms, such as YouTube or Soundcloud to conclude agreements with right holders for the use of their content. Sites like these, where singers, musicians and other artists upload their content, often make huge profits off the backs of their work with very little going to the creators themselves. Irish artists are seriously undervalued, and we need a system that ensures fair compensation for their creations, as well as protecting the fundamental rights of internet users.
From the very beginning Sinn Féin has sought to explicitly exclude the use of upload filters and other methods of monitoring and restricting internet users' rights through this legislation. We voted in favour of amendments seeking to ban such technologies, and have been consistently critical of any move towards a situation where internet platforms would be under a general monitoring obligation in order to comply with copyright rules. Since the final text rolled back on protections from last summer's vote, as well as having issues with Articles related to data mining and the link tax, we could not support the text as presented.
Matt
CARTHY
 FOR (+) . – I voted against the provisional agreement to this file and in favour of an amendment calling for amendments to be allowed to be tabled. The JURI Committee, who has lead this file, had its mandate on this file completely overturned in July last year at the first full vote of MEPs. Despite this, the final text returned to MEPs this time has reverted back with pretty much the same issues.
In order to ensure fair remuneration of artists Sinn Féin favours a licencing system, which should oblige large platforms, such as YouTube or Soundcloud to conclude agreements with right holders for the use of their content. Sites like these, where singers, musicians and other artists upload their content, often make huge profits off the backs of their work with very little going to the creators themselves. Irish artists are seriously undervalued, and we need a system that ensures fair compensation for their creations, as well as protecting the fundamental rights of internet users.
From the very beginning Sinn Féin has sought to explicitly exclude the use of upload filters and other methods of monitoring and restricting internet users' rights through this legislation. We voted in favour of amendments seeking to ban such technologies, and have been consistently critical of any move towards a situation where internet platforms would be under a general monitoring obligation in order to comply with copyright rules. Since the final text rolled back on protections from last summer's vote, as well as having issues with Articles related to data mining and the link tax, we could not support the text as presented.
Nessa
CHILDERS
 FOR (+) I am deeply disappointed with the outcome of today’s vote. I have had serious doubts about the implications of this copyright proposal for the online environment and for the freedoms individual users enjoy. Unfortunately, even the attempts we made since to safeguard right-holders without causing widespread damage to the interests of individual users were rejected by a majority.
As adopted in Parliament today, draconian provisions on liability for copyright infringement by individual users will force most platforms to preventively apply uploading filters so as not to fall afoul of the law. Likewise, this proposal fails to give users and platforms the legal certainty they need in order to quote and share snippets of news.
I fully appreciate and support all creators’ right to remuneration for their work, but similar attempts in national jurisdictions have failed to make them better off. It is now the turn of EU national governments to have their equal say on this proposal. I hope they will revisit these issues and listen to the many academics and internet experts who oppose it, as I cannot support it in its current form.
Deirdre
CLUNE
 AGAINST (+) I supported this mandate to start negotiations with Member States on new EU-wide copyright rules to ensure fair pay for artists and journalists in today’s digital world and to ensure a fair balance between European right-holders (artists, authors, musicians) and the online platforms
Brian
CROWLEY
 (excused)
Luke Ming
FLANAGAN
 FOR (+) Firstly, the debate around this report has demonstrated more than any other, the damaging effect that heavy lobbying can have on democracy. The Commission and the rapporteur have acted shamefully throughout the entire process, attempting to obfuscate and deflect when legitimate concerns from citizens were raised. I voted against the final report due to remaining concerns I had around censorship and freedom of expression. The text of the directive would still require most internet companies to pre-emptively scan and block user-generated content from being shared freely, which I cannot agree with. The easy sharing of information and ideas is what makes the internet useful and strengthen our democracy. I was disappointed that we were not given an opportunity to vote on amendments.
Marian
HARKIN
 AGAINST (+) I voted to challenge this mandate, which will allow the entire Parliament to have a final say on the proposed Copyright Directive in September. This is an extremely contentious issue for both creators of copyrighted material as well as the citizens of the EU and deserves further debate and input from MEPs.
Brian
HAYES
 AGAINST
Seán
KELLY
 AGAINST
Mairead
McGUINNESS
 AGAINST
Liadh
NÍ RIADA
 FOR (+) . – I voted against the provisional agreement to this file and in favour of an amendment calling for amendments to be allowed to be tabled. The JURI Committee, who has lead this file, had its mandate on this file completely overturned in July last year at the first full vote of MEPs. Despite this, the final text returned to MEPs this time has reverted back with pretty much the same issues.
In order to ensure fair remuneration of artists Sinn Féin favours a licencing system, which should oblige large platforms, such as YouTube or Soundcloud to conclude agreements with right holders for the use of their content. Sites like these, where singers, musicians and other artists upload their content, often make huge profits off the backs of their work with very little going to the creators themselves. Irish artists are seriously undervalued, and we need a system that ensures fair compensation for their creations, as well as protecting the fundamental rights of internet users.
From the very beginning Sinn Féin has sought to explicitly exclude the use of upload filters and other methods of monitoring and restricting internet users' rights through this legislation. We voted in favour of amendments seeking to ban such technologies, and have been consistently critical of any move towards a situation where internet platforms would be under a general monitoring obligation in order to comply with copyright rules. Since the final text rolled back on protections from last summer's vote, as well as having issues with Articles related to data mining and the link tax, we could not support the text as presented.